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An antarctic iceberg six times the size of Manhattan is drifting toward the Southern Ocean, soon to be swept into its brisk currents, NASA announced this week. The space agency's Earth-trained satellites have been tracking the iceberg since it broke off, or "calved," from the Pine Island Glacier in September 2013.
Fighting Back a Rising Tide | 22nd April 2014
About two years ago, while on the last portion of a journey down the Ganges River across India and Bangladesh, I found myself on a 20-foot wooden fishing boat, riding the blunt chop and slashing cross-currents of the Ganges as it merged with its sister-rivers, the Brahmaputra and the Meghna, and then poured into the Bay of Bengal. It was the height of the summer monsoon, and the rivers behaved like barely-strangled seas, casting smaller craft high into the air as their two- and three-man crews (or two-and-three-boy crews) worked the sails and clung to the gunwales like skateboarders on a half-pipe.
Top Antarctic scientists warns New Zealand "not ready" for worst as ice shelves and sea ice in Antarctica retreat and the climate changes. Gary Wilson: "Can we mitigate this or are we planning to adapt? I guess we're adapting... we're committed to some kind of climate change at this point"

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Welcome to Climate Change Monitoring

The RSOE EDIS Climate Change Monitoring Services is taking steps to bring this evidence to the public's attention, with the goal of building support for action to reduce the heat-trapping gas emissions that cause global warming. We have developed - and always updated - a world map, viewable online and also available as an Online Maps, that shows where the fingerprints and harbingers of global warming have occurred in recent years. By showing the local consequences of climate change, it brings the message home effectively.

Frustrated because a friend or colleague says global warming is the future's problem?

Compelling new evidence demonstrates that global warming is already under way with consequences that must be faced today as well as tomorrow. The evidence is of two kinds:

  • Fingerprints of global warming are indicators of the global, long-term warming trend observed in the historical record. They include heat waves, sea-level rise, melting glaciers and warming of the poles.
  • Harbingers are events that foreshadow the impacts likely to become more frequent and widespread with continued warming. They include spreading disease, earlier spring arrival, plant and animal range shifts, coral reef bleaching, downpours, and droughts and fires.

Climate Change events