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The ongoing rise in greenhouse gas emissions may trigger a rapid, irreversible collapse in an Antarctic ice sheet the size of Mexico, with potentially catastrophic consequences, a study published last week in the journal Nature found.
Extreme temperatures linked to climate change can be expected to cause a significant increase in the number of premature deaths, according to a report released Monday by the Obama administration.
A new report nearly doubles previous predictions for sea level rise if global emissions continue unabated, portending a doomsday scenario for many of the world’s coastal cities.

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News of Climate Change

Extreme temperatures linked to climate change can be expected to cause a significant increase in the number of premature deaths, according to a report released Monday by the Obama administration.

The report, completed over three years by 100 experts in eight federal agencies, estimated an additional 11,000 heat-related deaths during the the summer of 2030. That number is expected to rise to 27,000 by the summer of 2100, the report said. The rise outpaced projected decreases in deaths from extreme cold. “I don’t know that we’ve seen something like this before, where we have a force that has such a multitude of effects,” Surgeon General Vivek Murthy told reporters at the White House about the study, Reuters reported. “There’s not one single source that we can target with climate change, there are multiple paths that we have to address.” Climate change also threatens the mental health of people living in areas prone to extreme weather changes, such as hurricanes and floods, the study said. “The cumulative and interactive effects of climate change, as well as the threat and perception of climate change, adversely impact individual and societal physical and mental health and well-being,” the study claimed. “Mental health consequences of climate change range from minimal stress and distress symptoms to clinical disorders, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.” The report also predicted an increase in air pollution and airborne allergens, as well as “extreme events,” such as droughts, wildfires and flooding. John Holdren, President Obama’s senior science adviser, said the historic global climate agreement reached last year at COP21 to curb emissions can help fight the health risks detailed in the report, Reuters reported.

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